In Fresh News

Stay wider of the rider:

We are all road users, and we need to be mindful of everyone. Motorists and cyclists can both enjoy the road. As we get nearer to the Coronation Double Century event that covers 200km n the R62 and R317, we thought we’d share some tips for cyclists and motorists.

  1. Bicycles are considered vehicles in South Africa. Expect to see them on your journey and respect their right to be there.
  2. Have patience for everyone, including cyclist and pedestrians.
  3. Make sure it is safe for you, the cyclist and oncoming traffic before you pass a cyclist. Remember that passing at a speed will create a draft for the cyclist.
  4. Give enough space when passing a cyclist.
  5. Watch out for cyclists when turning left. They will likely be on your left, and possibly continuing straight.
  6. As with passing cars, and people, be sure to check in your mirror before opening your car door.
  7. Give cycling a try. The best way to understand road cyclist is to be in their position. And you might really like it.

Remember each cyclist is contributing positively to the environment and allowing that you get less traffic so do not be frustrated with them and rather greet them with a smile!

 

SAFE CYCLING – for cyclists

We are all road users, and we need to be mindful of everyone. Motorists and cyclists can both enjoy the road. As we get nearer to the Coronation Double Century event that covers 200km n the R62 and R317, we thought we’d share some tips for cyclists and motorists.

  1. Use your hand signals and ride predictably.
  2. Make sure you are highly visible when cycling.

The best place to place bright colours and reflectors are around your pedals and feet. The motion of pedalling will attract attention. You should definitely have a light on both your front and back, under the saddle for dawn or dusk cycling.

  1. Be sure to give your bike a quick checkup regularly, if not every time you ride. Of course the most important being the brakes.
  2. Be sure to wear a good helmet at all times. It has been the law for a good while, and it is going to protect you when most crucial. Gloves are a good investment. Instinctively you stick your hands out in an incident, so protecting it would be worthwhile.
    While not rated to visibility, it makes sense to check the weather and make sure you have dressed appropriately for the weather.
  3. Take extra precaution in rainy weather, which could affect the road and your brakes.
  4. Traffic rules. You need to know the rules for cycling on the road, as well as obeying all K53 traffic rules and they still adhere to the common courtesies of cycling. Being a driver aids your safety on the road by knowing the road rules and being able to better predict what drivers are likely to do. Looking left and right become second nature. Make sure your children know these rules as best possible.
  5. Be mindful of where you cycle. While most motorists think you must cycle as left as possible, this is not always the safest. There might be drain or debris in your path and the extra metre allow you some room you swerve into should you need it.
  6. Remember where you can and cannot cycle. This includes freeways such as the N1, N2 and N3. Use the cycle lane if one is available.